Icons of Europe This fleur-de-lys represents the aims of Icons of Europe asbl.  The fleur-de-lys figure has been used as an ornament or emblem by almost all civilisations of the old and new worlds.
Czech Republic Home
ICONS / HERITAGE OF CZECH REPUBLIC Click the flag above
Antonín Dvorák (1841-1904) was born near Prague.  Dvorák composed works such as Slavonic Dances, which often incorporated folk music.  His final symphony, "From the New World", was composed while he was director of the National Conservatory in New York City (1892–1895). Baroness Bertha Sophie Felicita von Suttner (1843-1914), the writer and pacifist, was born in Prague.  In 1876 she married a fellow novelist, Baron Arthur von Suttner (1850–1902), and founded in 1891 an Austrian Society of Friends of Peace.  She influenced Alfred Nobel to establish the Nobel Prize for Peace, and was awarded the prize herself in 1905. Gustav Mahler (1860-1911) was born in Kalist, Czech Republic (formerly Bohemia).  In Vienna, he worked as a conductor and became artistic director of the Court Opera in 1897.  He later devoted himself to composition and the concert platform.  He is best known for the song-symphony "Das Lied von der Erde".  Photo provided by Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks. Alphonse Maria Mucha (1860-1939) is "most often remembered for the prominent role he played in shaping the aesthetics of French Art Nouveau at the turn of the century.  As a struggling and relatively unknown artist of Czech origin living in Paris, Mucha achieved immediate fame when, in December 1894, he accepted a commission to create a poster for one of the greatest actresses of this time, Sarah Bernhardt" (Mucha Museum, Prague). Franz Kafka (1883-1924) was born near Prague.  His writings including "The Trial" and "The Metamorphosis", with their themes of alienation from society and a general anxiety over just being alive, had a strong influence on European intellectuals. Jaroslav Heyrovsky (1890-1967) was born in Prague.  He studied at Charles University in Prague and University College, London, where his work led to his discovery of polarography in 1922.  He became professor of physical chemistry at Charles University (1926–1954), where he continued to develop and improve his discovery and its application. Heyrovsky was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1959. Carl Ferdinand Cori (1896-1984) and Gerty Theresa Cori (1896-1957), husband and wife, were born in Prague.  They studied medicine at Prague University and emigrated in 1922 to the United States.  In New York and St. Louis they conducted research  into glucose–glycogen metabolism and the enzymes of animal tissue, and they shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine 1947. Carl Ferdinand Cori (1896-1984) and Gerty Theresa Cori, née Radnitz (1896-1957), husband and wife, were born in Prague.  They studied medicine at Prague University and emigrated in 1922 to the United States.  In New York and St. Louis they conducted research  into glucose–glycogen metabolism and the enzymes of animal tissue, and they shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine 1947. Jaroslav Seifert (1901-1986) was born in Prague.  His first poetry collection was "Męsto v slzáck" (1921, City of Tears).  Later works include "Zhasnęte svętla" (1938, Put Out The Lights), and the appearance of the post-war volume "Prílba hlíny" (1945, A Helmet of Earth) established him as the national poet.  Seifert was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature 1984.
Antonín Dvorák
1841-1904
Baroness
von Suttner
1843-1914
Gustav Mahler
1860-1911
Alphonse Mucha
1860-1939
Franz Kafka
1883-1924
Jaroslav Heyrovsky
1890-1967
Carl F. Cori
1896-1984
Gerty T. Cori
1896-1957
Jaroslav Seifert
1901-1986

Bohuslav Martinů (1890-1959) Bohuslav Martinu (1890-1959) was born in Policka, Czech Republic.  He studied at Prague Conservatory under Joseph Suk and worked later in Paris. He fled to America in 1941, where he produced a number of important works, including his first symphony, commissioned by Koussevitzky for the Boston Symphony Orchestra.  >> More
 
Prague:   Centre of Science and the Arts
Prague is full of music - from the opera and the concert halls to the street.  A trio playing near the Château (April 2002).  Photo by Jens A. Jorgensen;  copyright  © 2002 Icons of Europe asbl. Charles IV (1316-1378), King of Bohemia and Holy Roman Emperor, initiated Prague's golden age.  Emperor Rudolph II (1576-1612) invited Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler and other famous scientists to live and work in the city.

About us | Feedback
 
Selected by Icons of Europe asbl, the above Icons and institutions are eclectic examples of the cultural heritage and diversity of this country.  The selection does not necessarily represent a balanced view of the rich culture of the country.  We welcome suggestions to enhance the selection.